{"authors":[{"id":"1747844279","orcid":"0000-0002-1531-8199","email":"richard.bowman@cantab.net","name":"Dr. Richard W. Bowman","affiliation":"University of Cambridge"}],"bricks":[{"abstract":"A 3D-printed microscope, including a flexure-based XYZ stage with sub-micron precision and 8mm range.","id":"993466590","functions":[{"id":"518036698","description":"Optical components (lens and sensor)","implementations":[{"id":"107837596","quantity":1,"type":"brick"}]},{"id":"1705195835","description":"Fine positioning control","implementations":[{"id":"909106319","quantity":1,"type":"brick"}]},{"id":"1669983658","description":"Microscope Feet","implementations":[{"id":"367417014","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"2102312477","description":"Mechanical stage","implementations":[{"id":"238216425","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"450245988","description":"Illumination","implementations":[{"id":"735104653","quantity":1,"type":"part"},{"id":"702468006","quantity":1,"type":"part"},{"id":"450509554","quantity":1,"type":"part"},{"id":"1995350498","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"1925510102","description":"Sample Holder","implementations":[{"id":"589229119","quantity":1,"type":"part"},{"id":"589229119","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"1158588719","description":"Control Computer","implementations":[{"id":"994386346","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"1396286130","description":"Printer test object","implementations":[{"id":"86921105","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]}],"authors":["1747844279"],"files":[],"long_description":"Optomechanics is a crucial part of any microscope; when working at high magnification, it is absolutely crucial to keep the sample steady and to be able to bring it into focus precisely. Accurate motion control is extremely difficult using printed mechanical parts, as good linear motion typically requires tight tolerances and a smooth surface finish. This design for a 3D printed microscope stage uses plastic flexures, meaning its motion is free from friction and vibration. It achieves steps well below 100nm when driven with miniature stepper motors, and is stable to within a few microns over several days.\n\nThis design aims to minimise both the amount of post-print assembly required, and the number of non-printed parts required - partly to make it as easy as possible to print, and partly to maximise stability; most of the microscope (including all the parts with flexures) prints as a single piece. The majority of the expense is in the Raspberry Pi and its camera module; the design requires only around 100g of plastic and a few nuts, bolts and other parts. The optics module (containing the camera and lens) can be easily swapped out or modified, for example to add epifluorescence or change the magnification.","instructions":[{"name":"assembly","steps":[{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3584.jpg"}],"description":"First, you will need to print or obtain the 3D printed parts.\n\nThe microscope is designed to print without support material. This is quite important; if you use support material it will require a lot of cleaning up, and you may well damage the mechanism. I usually print with a layer size of 0.24mm on my Ormerod, which takes 8 hours for the main structure. \u201Clow\u201D quality on an Ultimaker 2 produced similar results in about 5 hours. \nIf your printer has a standard-sized bed (180mmx180mm should be fine) then it might be possible to print the complete microscope in one go. I do this whenever I\u2019m using a machine that is well calibrated and reliable. However, I find that it\u2019s often more reliable to print in batches (as small parts at the edge of the print bed can detach and cause it to fail). I would recommend:\nBatch 1: Microscope and Optics module (main part)\nBatch 2: Feet, gears, camera cover, illumination\nThere is a test file that prints a single leg of the microscope - the Microscope leg test object. It's worth printing this first to check your settings are OK.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3588.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3590.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3592.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/0-DSCF3595c.jpg"}],"description":"Next, assemble all the necessary parts and tools. You'll likely need needle nose pliers (preferably two pairs), a 3mm drill bit (for cleaning out the holes, you can use a screw in a pinch), and the all-important bent paperclip (see the physical part description). The parts should all be listed in the bill of materials.\n\nDon\u2019t forget the raspberry pi, camera module, and associated screen, power supply, SD card, keyboard, mouse, etc. (I have not listed these explicitly, but they're needed to run the Pi).","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/0-DSCF3602.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3606.jpg"}],"description":"We start by opening out the three holes in the microscope body with a drill as shown. Make sure to go all the way through. If you don\u2019t have a drill, you can improvise by screwing in an M3 screw all the way, then forcibly rotating it with a screwdriver. While you\u2019re at it, do the same for the illumination mount. Also, remove any loose strings of plastic from the underside of the actuator housings or sample stage, using a pair of pliers. The last step shouldn't be necessary if your machine is calibrated nicely for printing bridges.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3680.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3681.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3682.jpg"}],"description":"First, the rear foot fits in the bottom of the illumination column \u2013 the opening faces the centre of the microscope. You may need to squeeze it slightly to fit it in.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/0-DSCF3643.jpg"}],"description":"Next, assemble the three actuators, as described in the \"Anti-backlash flexure actuator\" brick. You might find the central actuator is the best one to start with. This step is the most time consuming in the microscope.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/0-DSCF3686.jpg"}],"description":"Assemble the Raspberry Pi lens and camera into the optics module, as described in the \"Raspberry Pi Camera Mount\/Extension Tube\" brick.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3690.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3691.jpg"}],"description":"Slot the optics module onto the dovetail mount, from the bottom. You may find it easier to fit if you wiggle the module from side to side as it goes in. It may also help to support the dovetail from the top (through the hole in the stage), as it will flex when you push the objective on to it. \nNB the module shown here doesn't have the cover fitted on the PCB - yours should.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3687.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3696.jpg"}],"description":"Slot the illumination arm into the holder at the top of the microscope. Again, a little wiggle might help persuade it in.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3698.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3700.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3701.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3707.jpg"}],"description":"After this, there are only the sample clips to go \u2013 exactly where you place these will depend on the samples you intend to use, but in any case you simply push the M3 screws into the clips, then screw down into the holes on the stage.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3711.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3712.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3713.jpg"}],"description":"The LED needs to sit in the illumination mount, and the wires then run inside the illumination column to the GPIO pins on the raspberry pi, where they connect to the 5v supply. First, make up the leads by joining two jumpers with a resistor, and the other two with an offcut of the resistor\u2019s leg.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3716.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3717.jpg"}],"description":"Next, fit the LED into the hole, and bend the legs so they run down the illumination mount.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3718.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3719.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3720.jpg"}],"description":"Thread the leads up through the slit at the back of the microscope and connect to the LED (the longer lead is the positive terminal). Secure this with some tape (I use kapton tape but any tape should do). \nThe ground (blue in the picture above) and positive (red) wires fit on to the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins, I use the 5V closest to the corner of the Pi (or the second one along), and the ground pin next-but-one to it (i.e. the third pin from the corner, closest to the edge).","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3721.jpg"}],"description":"Your microscope is now complete \u2013 happy observing! \nYou might want to consult https:\/\/www.raspberrypi.org\/documentation\/usage\/camera\/ or https:\/\/www.raspberrypi.org\/documentation\/usage\/camera\/raspicam\/README.md if you need a hand setting up the camera.","components":[]}]}],"name":"OpenFlexure Microscope","license":"CERN Open Hardware License","notes":"This is the first \"stable\" release of the microscope; ongoing development lives on the Github page [todo: link].\n\nThere is a preprint describing the mechanical performance of the microscope on arXiv here: http:\/\/arxiv.org\/abs\/1509.05394\n\nThis microscope will be available through http:\/\/www.waterscope.org\/ in the next few months, as a kit (with or without printed parts and Raspberry Pi) or fully assembled."},{"abstract":"This is a push-fit extension tube that turns a Raspberry Pi camera module into a microscope with a field of view about 400um across and a resolution of around 2um.","id":"107837596","functions":[{"id":"592176179","description":"Mechanical holder","implementations":[{"id":"53886429","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"252462582","description":"Optics and Sensor","implementations":[{"id":"367417014","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"996729609","description":"Tools for removing the lens","implementations":[]}],"authors":[],"files":[],"long_description":"This is the optics module for the OpenFlexure Microscope. It holds a Raspberry Pi camera module and lens, but the lens is reversed and placed 40mm from the sensor, allowing it to function as a high-magnification microscope with a resolution of around 2um. The push-fit mount for the camera module should be useful in other designs, too.","instructions":[{"name":"assembly","steps":[{"files":[],"description":"First, we need to remove the lens from the camera module. This is usually held in with glue - while you can often crack the glue just by twisting the lens, it can be much easier if you first run a scalpel or craft knife around the join between the lens and the square plastic holder.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3664.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3665.jpg"}],"description":"Next, unscrew the lens from the camera module. This step must be done with great care, as there is a small brown ribbon cable connecting the camera to the PCB that is very easy to break. The printed tools make this much safer: there's a square plastic piece that fits over the camera and PCB, which stops the camera twisting and damaging the ribbon cable. There's also a pair of plastic pliers that are good at gripping the lens module, though miniature combination pliers may well do a better job. Care is needed to avoid marring the plastic lens holder too badly - some cosmetic damage is inevitable but too much is a problem. I find it easier to hold the pliers still on the lens and rotate the camera board to unscrew it than to hold the board still and rotate the pliers, but your experience may vary.\n\nOnce you've removed the lens, be sure to place the camera face down on the desk, or put a piece of tape over the square black lens holder; this will help stop dust settling on the sensor, which is hard to clean.","components":[]},{"files":[],"description":"Before assembling the parts into the holder, make sure it's free from dust by blowing air through it.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3684.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3685.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3686.jpg"}],"description":"Next, put the lens into the holder. This may take a small amount of force, or may fit very easily and require a layer of insulating tape wrapped around the lens to make it fit tightly (depending on your printer). If it looks like it will require too much force, you may have a different design of camera module and you should re-print the part slightly larger. If you wrapped tape around the lens, trim off any tape that protrudes above the lens with a scalpel or sharp craft knife.\n\nNB the photos here are for an older version (5.11), where the lens and camera were held on separate mounts. The latest version has the lens in one end and the camera in the other end of the same mount.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3669.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3670.jpg"}],"description":"Finally, press the camera module onto the bottom of the optics mount. This used to require considerable force, so I recommended placing the camera board on a soft surface (e.g. some bubble wrap) and pushing down. The newer push-fit is much easier to use, and should fit in with a firm press from your thumb.","components":[]},{"files":[],"description":"Lastly, slide the cover over the camera board, starting at the end farthest from the ribbon cable connector. This will stop the camera falling out, and also protects the PCB from short circuits.","components":[]}]}],"name":"Raspbery Pi Camera Mount\/Extension Tube","license":"","notes":""},{"abstract":"An actuator, based on an M3 screw, brass nut, and elastic bands, that can precisely and repeatably move a plastic flexure mechanism.","id":"909106319","functions":[{"id":"118469770","description":"Lead screw, nut and washers","implementations":[{"id":"994401804","quantity":1,"type":"part"},{"id":"152726439","quantity":1,"type":"part"},{"id":"1673661896","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"1977413028","description":"Return spring","implementations":[{"id":"1798060650","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"1731604542","description":"Actuating gear\/thumbwheel","implementations":[{"id":"367417014","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]},{"id":"1899580337","description":"Tool for pulling elastic bands","implementations":[{"id":"702468006","quantity":1,"type":"part"},{"id":"72777443","quantity":1,"type":"part"}]}],"authors":[],"files":[],"long_description":"This assembly is used to actuate each of the three axes of the OpenFlexure Microscope stage. I've included all the parts here except the main microscope body, as this is included in the main microscope brick. It consists of a plastic gear that fits onto an M3 screw, which then pulls up on a brass nut. Elastic bands pull down on the nut, tensioning the system. This confers two benefits: firstly, it allows us to actuate the flexure mechanism both up and down - doubling the travel - and secondly, it eliminates much of the backlash from the system.","instructions":[{"name":"","steps":[]},{"name":"assembly","steps":[{"files":[],"description":"There are three of these actuators on the microscope: these steps should be followed for each one in turn. Note the quantities in the parts list are for one actuator, and they don't include the microscope body.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3597.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3598.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3609.jpg"}],"description":"We need to place a nut inside each actuator: screw a brass nut onto the end of a screw, and press it in firmly. The actuator will move \u2013 this is normal.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3610.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3611.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3614.jpg"}],"description":"Gently unscrew the screw, leaving the nut in place. Then screw into the nut from the top of the microscope, gently at first to avoid dislodging the nut, but then do it up tightly. Use a couple of washers to avoid damaging the microscope. Hold the microscope upside down if the nut didn\u2019t wedge in correctly.\n\nYou can also do this using one of the hex-head screws with the thumbwheel\/gear attached - this means you don't need a screwdriver.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3616.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3622.jpg"}],"description":"After doing up the screw very tightly (to pull the nut firmly into the actuator), unscrew the screw to lower the actuator a few millimetres, but don\u2019t lower it all the way. If you're using an assembled screw with gear, you can print a U-shaped spacer to lift the gear out of the way and allow you to hook the elastic bands through more easily.\nIf you're using a hexagon-head screw, you may not be able to do it up very tightly. In that case, pull it as tight as you can, and then tighten it all the way once you've assembled the gear in a later step.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3624.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/1-DSCF3595c.jpg"}],"description":"This is the tricky part. Remember the middle foot is different (it\u2019s not tilted on the bottom) so don\u2019t get mixed up! For each actuator you will need a foot and two elastic bands, as well as the all-important bent paperclip tool!","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3625.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3626.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3627.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3628.jpg"}],"description":"First, double up the elastic bands (so it looks like you have four smaller elastic bands) and pull it part way through one of the slots in the foot. It helps if you stretch the elastic bands while you do this, as it makes them narrower. Hold the bands in place with a screwdriver, spare screw, or other suitable object.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3629.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3630.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3631.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3632.jpg"}],"description":"Repeat the process on the other slot:","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3634.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3635.jpg"}],"description":"You should now have something that looks like the pictures below \u2013 you may need to push the elastic bands around a little to neaten it up.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3638.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3639.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3641.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3643.jpg"}],"description":"Now place the foot underneath the microscope as shown. Note that the cut-out on the foot goes towards the stage. Use the hook to pull the elastic bands up and over the slots on each side of the actuator.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3645.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3647.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3648.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3650.jpg"}],"description":"After hooking one band over, it should look like the picture below. Repeat until all the bands are hooked over, you can hook multiple bands each time. Once you\u2019re done, remove the screwdriver and the foot should snap into place. If you pull the foot down a few millimetres, you should see the bands running neatly vertical \u2013 if not, you\u2019ve probably crossed them over (though this isn\u2019t a major problem).","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3652.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3653.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3654.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3659.jpg"}],"description":"Once the bands are in place, it is time to put the gear on the top, assuming you've not already done so. You\u2019ll need a hexagon-head screw (possibly the one you used to hold the actuator up during assembly), and one or two washers. Push the screw through the hole, so that the hexagonal head (or the steel nut that was screwed up against the head, if you don't have hexagon head screws) sits in the hexagonal recess. If it's a tight fit (which is a good thing) you may find it easiest to place the head of the screw on the table and push down on the gear.\nPlace the washer(s) onto the shaft of the screw before inserting into the microscope.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3672.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3673.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3674.jpg"}],"description":"Now thread the screw into the nut that's inside the microscope. You'll need to be gentle, particularly if you've not jammed it in too hard. It might help to push up on the bottom of the actuator as shown, to align the nut properly. Once you're sure the nut is sitting properly on the screw, screw it in all the way until the resistance - most likely there will be a period of several (up to ten or so) turns of the gear when there is quite a bit of resistance. Keep going through this (it's the nut being pulled through the plastic to the right place, and also the screw head being properly pulled into the gear) and stop when the resistance increases markedly a second time.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3677.jpg"},{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3679.jpg"}],"description":"Congratulations, you've assembled the actuator! There are three to do, so you may now need to go back and make the next one.","components":[]}]}],"name":"Anti-backlash flexure actuator","license":"","notes":""}],"parts":[{"id":"152726439","files":[],"description":"M3 Nuts (preferably brass)","name":"M3 Nuts (preferably brass)","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"These nuts form part of the actuator. Brass ones will have less friction and result in smoother motion.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"994401804","files":[],"description":"30mm M3 Hexagon-head screw, Qty:3","name":"30mm M3 Hexagon-head screw, Qty:3","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"These screws are used as the lead screws for the stage; stainless steel is probably best. If hexagon-head screws are not available, a good substitute is to screw a nut tightly against the head of the screw, so the screw can still be turned by the thumbwheel or gear.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"1673661896","files":[],"description":"M3 Washer, Qty: 6","name":"M3 Washer, Qty: 6","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"1392832614","files":[],"description":"White LED, 3mm diameter, 15 degree beam angle","name":"White LED, 3mm diameter, 15 degree beam angle","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"The white LED is for illumination. Exact specifications are unimportant, but this is the one I use.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"1476094922","files":[],"description":"40 Ohm resistor","name":"40 Ohm resistor","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"This resistor allows the LED to be run from a 5V GPIO pin on the Raspberry Pi. If you use a different LED, you may need a different resistor. Note the maximum current you can draw from the Pi is not huge.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"450509554","files":[],"description":"Jumper wires with female header pin connectors","name":"Jumper wires with female header pin connectors","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"You need wires to connect the LED to the 5V power supply from the Raspberry Pi. My preferred option is two cores from a ribbon cable, soldered to the LED and resistor at one end and with a crimped-on connector at the other. If you want a no-soldering solution, four female-female jumpers allow you to connect everything (using a cut-off leg of the resistor to join two of them together).","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"1798060650","files":[],"description":"Elastic bands, qty:6","name":"Elastic bands, qty:6","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"I use thin (~1mmx1mm in cross section) elastic bands, around 15cm long unstretched, and put two of them on each actuator.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"994386346","files":[],"description":"Raspberry Pi","name":"Raspberry Pi","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"Any model will do!","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"2120462144","files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3661.jpg"}],"description":"Raspberry Pi Camera Module","name":"Raspberry Pi Camera Module","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"238216425","files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/piscope_5_12.stl"}],"description":"Microscope Body","name":"Microscope Body","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3583.jpg"}],"description":"This should be printed without support material. On smaller\/less well calibrated machines, I print this part on its own and then print the rest of the parts in a second print. The microscope body takes around 8 hours on a RepRapPro Ormerod (and many other low-end printers) or about 5 hours on Ultimaker, MakerBot, and the like.","components":[]},{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3602.jpg"}],"description":"After printing, you should run a 3mm drill bit through the 3mm holes in each actuator, to ensure the screws can rotate freely.","components":[]},{"files":[],"description":"You may need to use needle-nose pliers to pull strings of plastic from the underside of the microscope stage or the underside of the caps of the actuator columns. If your printer is correctly calibrated there shouldn't be much, and I often get away without any - but some printers (particularly if using ABS) are prone to a bit of \"spaghetti\" under the stage.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.1","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"291392559","files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/untilted_foot.stl"},{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/0-untilted_foot.stl"}],"description":"Microscope feet","name":"Microscope feet","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.01","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"53886429","files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/optics_all_in_one.stl"},{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/camera_cover.stl"}],"description":"Optics module plastic parts","name":"Optics module plastic parts","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"The optics module needs to print with some fine detail, so the dovetail meshes nicely with the stage. A good way to ensure this is to print it at the same time as other parts - either other copies of the same thing, or possibly even print it at the same time as the microscope body. This slows down the time for each layer, and means the plastic can cool more completely before the layer on top is deposited, resulting in a higher-quality part.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.01","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"367417014","files":[{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/camera_lens_pliers.stl"},{"url":".\/.\/.\/usdata\/camera_board_gripper.stl"}],"description":"Camera lens removal tools","name":"Camera lens removal tools","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"These tools make it much easier to remove the lens from a Raspberry Pi camera module. See the documentation for the Raspberry Pi Camera Mount\/Extension Tube for instructions.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.01","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"735104653","files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/gear.stl"}],"description":"Gear\/thumbscrew","name":"Gear\/thumbscrew","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"These gears are used to control the leadscrews that move the stage. You can replace them with more comfortable thumbscrews if desired, or use stepper motors to drive them automatically.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.01","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"702468006","files":[],"description":"Paperclip","name":"Paperclip","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/DSCF3595c.jpg"}],"description":"You need a paperclip (or other relatively stiff piece of wire) to pull the elastic bands through the structure. I find the handle from a foldback clip works well. The exact shape you use is not important, but it probably needs to have a small (<3mm wide) hook at one end, a straight section in the middle, and some sort of handle at the end. I have included a photograph of my usual shape.\n\nTypically I use two pairs of pliers to bend this. Hopefully this will come as a part of the kit of non-printed parts that we hope to start selling soon.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"1995350498","files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/illumination.stl"}],"description":"Illumination mount","name":"Illumination mount","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"The illumination fits on to the microscope using a dovetail: this prints best with other parts (i.e. the time for each layer to cool is increased by printing other parts at the same time). It's not too tall, so could be printed with (for example) the microscope feet.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.01","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"589229119","files":[],"description":"8mm M3 screws, Qty: 2","name":"8mm M3 screws, Qty: 2","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"NONE","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"640980340","files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/sample_clip.stl"}],"description":"Sample Clip, Qty:2","name":"Sample Clip, Qty:2","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"These are optional, but they are useful for holding slides on the stage. Two are required.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.002","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"86921105","files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/just_leg_test.stl"}],"description":"Microscope leg test object","name":"Microscope leg test object","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"This test piece checks your printer can bridge between the tops of the legs without failing. If it passes this test, you're probably fine to print the rest of the microscope.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.01","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""},{"id":"72777443","files":[{"url":".\/.\/usdata\/gear_elevator.stl"}],"description":"Spacer for actuating gear","name":"Spacer for actuating gear","manufacturing_instruction":{"steps":[{"files":[],"description":"This part is optional - it's useful if you want to assemble the elastic bands after putting the gears on; it lifts the gear out of the way.","components":[]}]},"supplier_part_num":"","material_amount":"0.001","manufacturer_part_num":"","material_unit":"KG","url":"","supplier":""}]}

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